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in this election, certainly the convention in tampa and then sandy. it's easy to measure the impact but among the voters that decided last night and in the last seven days barack obama actually won a majority which is a huge surprise to political scientists around the country who will tell you when you have an incumbent challenger the challenger picks up the majority of the last voters and the so-called undecided voters. in this case they broke for the incumbent and sandy probably had something to do with that. so i think it is a matter of policy. it's a matter of outreach that includes people speaking for the republican party and a matter of tone making people feel that this is not just an inclusive party, these policies are inclusive and the way to create more jobs and never can be for everybody is to have the policies that were enunciated in the plan that met on the lead out and we were not successful getting it to that level. >> do you think the comments by the senatorial candidates todd akin and richard more mattered in the polling that use all for the republicans brought the? >> yes. ag
presentation. wondered how hurricane sandy and the possible need for fema to get emergency supplemental aid will impact on the lame-duck and if you could talk a little bit about that and if you think the cr that goes through march now will be voted into that to be finished out for the year. >> let me talk about that because i wasn't appropriator. the preparation process is not only broken down, it's jut down. as a consequence, all of the recent decisions are made with respect to the cr. the cr ultimately is written to the leader's office. so those decisions will not be made in the lame-duck by majorities on either side. it will be made by harry reid on the senate side and neither agreed to or acquiesced in by john boehner on the house side. it's the worst rate in appropriate is to put it on the hands of one man, two men in this case. i can't give you any guidance on that. talk to john boehner and see what he agreed to. there would be no logical appropriations process with respect to these issues. >> banks. i was wondering who would be among the first of the cabinet secretaries that will be
government is going to do, like roads and bridges, and now we're in the middle after hurricane sandy like fema. and i think dean is a very interesting question that befuddles me because it started with jimmy carter, one of jimmy carter's, numbered bureaucratic innovations was fema. and reagan did was take it scarce and did we take it certificate didn't staff it with professional. then in 92 bush senior got burned with a response to hurricane andrew in florida. and clinton wrote in his autobiography, i made a mental note at the time, i'm not going to get elected because of my disaster management record but i could sure lose this job i'll make darshan going to hire a pro that will really with fema into shape, which he did. and then bush junior comes in the. he has a government agency after eight years, which everybody likes. no one is mad at fema in 2000. and then bush, for nobody is reason to me, besides forget it, let's start privatizing functions again. let's put and political cronies again. let's go back to the old way. and he got burned. and so obama comes back and put in a pro. people
about sandy and all that, but there's no question -- and i'm certainly a global warming worrier and one who -- >> do you believe it's happening? >> well, i don't know how you can't. >> >> just asking, just asking. [applause] >> sandy is, like, okay, fine, we had that. but there's every other piece of evidence is just so overwhelming, you know? you and i were talking at lunch about how you have to look at the numbers and take the numbers as numbers, and these are numbers. whether it's temperatures, sea levels or any of that stuff. so you can't not believe it. but i do think -- [laughter] i don't think hardly anybody believes that we're not having global warming, right? is there anybody? >> a few. there are a few people who still say that. >> but, look, i do think everything -- these are balances, right? we can have a zero tolerance policy on any damage, and we'll have in economy and no jobs, just sort of let everybody run wild, and we'll all be underwater and unable to priest or something -- unable to breathe, and i think right now we're at a pretty good balance in terms of people's awar
the program being overhauled as a result of what happened because of sandy? >> okay. in reference to your first question, i don't think, you know, it's a day after the election. i don't, you know, what is going to happen with the dscc. first you'd have to ask people, including senator gillibrand, whether she'd want it, and i haven'ted talked to her about it yet. we talked about elections and congratulations, and she did a great job in the senate in the first six years, first two years and will do a great job in the next six years. she's a great partner to have, and i'm glad she won an overwhelming victory and proud of the victory that she won. in terms of flood insurance, obviously, you know, we have huge damage in new york. it is incredible. um, i flew by helicopter the first day with the mayor and a little later, next day with the governor. and you saw how broad the damage was, you know, it wasn't just one community or two communities, but just spread out all over a huge area, huge metropolitan area. and then for the four days after that or five or six spent time on the ground, and you
of the egyptian desert which is to say sandy, flat, rocky, bleak. you can't imagine why this point would be the place where two armies, you know, sort of came to a halt and dug in. but the reason is because it couldn't be outflanked. it was blocked on the north by the mediterranean sea. on the south there's kind of a marshy, sandy area called the qatar depression which can't really be -- it's impossible to heavy vehicles such as tanks, for instance. rommel likes -- one of rommel's tricks when he was fighting was to skirt around to posing army and jump on him from behind. so that couldn't happen here. among them were my five soldiers. and when they got to egypt in ir the first time in more than a year, they were separated in two groups. jack brister and dirke joined the first battalion king's royal rifle corps and went down with the seventh armored division which was the storied desert rats. they were a very famous part of the british army. cox, bolte and hayward cutting were sent out with the second battalion. so between those two groups they pretty much saw most of the battle when it fi
that it was sandy and flat and rocky. you cannot imagine why this would be the point where the two armies came to a halt. the reason is it was blocked on the north by the mediterranean sea. on the south, there was kind of a marsh area which it is impossible for heavy vehicles, such as tanks, one of his tricks when he was fighting was to go around the opposing army and jump on them from behind. so that cannot happen here. the english were pouring material into the spot, getting ready to fight. when they got to egypt for the first time in more than a year, they were separated into two groups. they went down to the southern end of the line and they were very famous, it was a famous part of the british army. they sent off for the second battalion and went to the north end of the wind. line. between the two groups, they pretty much saw most of the battle and it finally came on october 23. now, i'm going to do a little discretion since we are hearing about hurricanes, to redo something that i wrote about my uncle's trip from his training battalion in egypt to the frontline. what i've tried to do thr
of a sandy area which is impossible for heavy vehicles such as tanks for instance. one of rommel's track's when he was around the opposing army was to jump on them from behind but that couldn't happen here. they were pouring material into the spot on the egyptian desert when he decided to fight, and then when they got to egypt for the first time the were separated into two groups. jack brister joined the first battalion and went down to the southern end of the line with the armored division which was the story of the desert, the very famous part of the british army. they were sent off with the second battalion and went up to the north end of the line so between them, between the two groups they pretty much saw most of the battle when it finally came october 23rd. i'm going to take a little digression since we are in vermont and we are hearing that hurricanes to read to read you something i wrote about my uncle's trip from his training from the front line it's really what i try to do as i thought about this is kind of trying to get inside of his mind as he drives across the egyptian deser
, sandy, rocky, flat. you can't imagine why the point would be the place where two are mays came to a halt. the reason because it congress be -- it was blocked on the north by the mediterranean sea, on the south there's a marshy area. it can't be impossible to have heave vehicles such as tanks, for instance. rommel, one of rommel's tricks when he was fighting was to skirt around the opposing army and jump ton from behind. that couldn't happen it here. the english were pouring material and men in to the spot in the egyptian dessert getting ready to fight. among them were my five soldiers. when they got to egypt for the first time in more than a year, they were separated in to two groups. jack and -- they joined the first bay battalion and went con to the other end of the line which was a story dessert rats, they were famous part of the british army. they were sent off with the second bay tollon. they went off to the north end of the line. wean the two groups they pretty much saw most of the battle when it finally came. october 23rd. i'm going take a little digression since we're in vermont
pallone of new jersey where he talks about thel situation with hurricane sandy in his state. >> another new jerseyersey. congressmen this is congressman frank pallone. congressman, thanks for joining us as you go ahead with your recovery efforts there and new jersey our last caller brought up some concern about being able to vote on tuesday after the damage frot the storm.aller brout up a is that going to be a problem ia blljersey? >> guest: wellguest: it may be n the sense of people being able to access a polling place. now, every authority whether it is the governor or the county clerk's -- they assured us that there will be places to vote. but if we have places to vote that are significantly distant from where people traditionally do vote, or where there is an access problem -- that does pose a problem. we have to make sure that there is a polling place that is operational, and in a reasonable location for people to vote. you cannot tell people that are in one town that they have got to go to another town to vote. first of all, many of them will not have transportation and you cannot
saw what we did what hurricane sandy. we can do this with the hurricane in the fiscal cliff coming if only we can get it up to a vote in the house. that may not happen and it may be that they cannot reach a deal on this plan because there is no procedural way to get a vote that would guarantee a few months down the road that you would actually need those targets. frankly finding a tax reform plan that raises a trillion dollars in revenue is far trickier than the 1986 tax reform that cut rates, broaden the base and eliminate the deduction but was revenue neutral, i was tough enough. but if they can manage to find that we may see that dynamic emerge let me make two other quick points. he was a loser and a winner on tuesday night. a winner because he won his house seat, a loser for the obvious reason but also for a couple of additional ones. it's kind of embarrassing when you are put on the ticket and you can't carry your own state. but also his percentage in his district went down significantly. at the same time, there was no question that paul ryan, who was a national figure but far
repeat the question. go ahead. >> [inaudible] >> the impact of hurricane sandy on the election; great question. >> well, our polling showed that there was an impact -- our final poll showed obama with 57% and romney with 47%. we had a dead tie a week earlier. so, the only intervening event at that time was sandy come and obama about 70% approval for his handling of the situation. a plurality of romney supporters also approved. i think in the end it was modest. i don't think it really ticked one way or the other. i think obama had been edging a little bit ahead even prior to the hurricane. i think the last two debates obviously not as important as the first. it never is. but, you know obama had not only stemmed the momentum following the first debate, but also i think had developed slightly a little bit of his own. i think in the end it probably helped him. certainly the atmospherics and the symbols of chris christi embracing him on a well-known republican helped him i think was on the margin pretty much. might have felt in the popular vote of northeast. we did see a big swing for obam
] >> the federal and state response to hurricane sandy continues. join us in just under an hour for today's fema briefing. the conference call will include fema chief craig fugate among others, you'll be able to listen to that live at 11:30 eastern on our companion network, c-span. and, of course, the road to the white house continues. now less than a week before the election. ann romney is in the swing state of ohio today campaigning for her husband, of course. you'll be able to see her remarks live starting at noon eastern on c-span. a little bit later this afternoon it'll be mitt romney in virginia at the farm bureau center in doswell, see that live at 2:15 eastern also on c-span. a little bit later the focus will shift to state races with a debate for candidates to represent rhode island's 1st district. watch that debate live at 7:30 eastern on c-span. and finally president obama is back on the campaign trail. we'll have him live from the university of colorado at boulder, and that's at 9 p.m. eastern. c-span will have that too. >> i regard medicare as not just a program, but a promise. i wa
can pinpoint hurricane sandy and isolate that's directly about climate change. but you cannot look at the signals, can't look at migration patterns, as angus just mentioned. here in maine we have a great resource. 75 professors and scientists, all universally say it's critical, and bass maine is a coastal state we're sensitive to this issue and, i wish the policy would stop. we don't have to debate gravity or physics, the worldes round. let's accept climate change and work aggressively. >> moderator: here's the next question. >> in maine, 16% of the population is age 65 or older and another 31% are between 45 and 64 years old. most either are depending or plan to depend on social security and medicare. can they rely on those programs? and how will you influence those benefits as maine's next senator? we'll start with andrew dodge. >> i would just point out that angus supports the keystone pipeline and the -- which is contradictory. when it comes to mobile security and medicare, it's important we protect the programs. we have to shore up the financial stability of both programs. whe
presentation. donna cruz from aids united. wonder how hurricane sandy and a possible need for fema to get some emergency supplemental funding will impact on the lame duck and if you could talk a little bit about that and if the, if you think the c.r. that goes through march now will be folded into that to be finished out for the year. >> let me talk about that, because i was an appropriator. um, the appropriations process has not only broken down, it's been shut down. and as a consequence, all appropriations decisions are made with respect to the c.r., and the c.r. ultimately is written in the leader's office. so those decisions will not be made in the lame duck by majorities on either side. they will be made by harry reid on the senate side and either agreed to or acquiesced in by john boehner on the house side. that's the worst way to legislate and appropriate is to put it all on the hands of one man, two men in this case. but that's the way it is. so i can't give you any guidance on that. talk to harry reid and see how he feels. talk to john boehner and see what he would agree to. but there
.8%. if you adjust a little bit for new york and new jersey having a really low turnout because of sandy, turnout in those states was 55.3. what i'd like, what i don't want to talk about is demographic substitutes. we are by the only people in the world who do not use exit polls were judging the turnout for subgroups. i am silent on that until six or eight months from now when the census bureau comes out with its current population survey and that's 90,000 people, much better and more reliable. when people say, you know, turnout went up between 18 and 19% of african-americans, that's too small a major to make that claim. we know that african-americans turned out in substantial numbers, and we know young people did not fall, have the same drop off as commenting, people predicted, including me. but i don't want to quantify. what i want to do is talk about something that is slightly different. our turnout increased beginning in 2000 through 2008. increased in very small amounts in 2000, 2002 because since 1996 and 98 were historically low turnouts. increased substantially in 2004, for a mid
a hearing on sandy and its effects? >> guest: i anticipate that -- i'm not sure if it would be necessarily at the federal level, but i know in terms of this -- i'm pretty confident that, and i was a state commissioner, that there will be some ais accessments minimally on a state-by-state level in terms of, again, looking at, um, what was done and looking at and evaluating and making pronouncements as to what we can do better. so there will be hearings, i'm not sure if it's going to escalate to the federal level. >> host: minion clyburn -- mignon clyburn and paul kirby, this is "the communicators" on c-span. >> tomorrow night watch the election results from the presidential campaign along with key contests in house, senate and governors' races on c-span. up next, a house debate with u.s. representative and former republican presidential candidate michele bachmann and her democratic challenger, jim graves to represent minnesota's 6th congressional district. then at 9 a.m. eastern we are live with an analysis of the competitive house and senate races with two former congressmen, republican to
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17

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